“THE UNCOMFORTABLE TRUTH ABOUT SWEDISH ANTI-SEMITISM” – Via “The New York Times”, of all places:

Historically, anti-Semitism in Sweden could mainly be attributed to right-wing extremists. While this problem persists, a study from 2013 showed that 51 percent of anti-Semitic incidents in Sweden were attributed to Muslim extremists. Only 5 percent were carried out by right-wing extremists; 25 percent were perpetrated by left-wing extremists.

Swedish politicians have no problem condemning anti-Semitism carried out by right-wingers. When neo-Nazis planned a march that would go past the Goteborg synagogue on Yom Kippur this September, for example, it stirred up outrage across the political spectrum. A court ruled that the demonstrators had to change their route.

There is, however, tremendous hesitation to speak out against hate crimes committed by members of another minority group in a country that prides itself on welcoming minorities and immigrants. In 2015, Sweden was second only to Germany in the number of Syrian refugees it welcomed. Yet the three men arrested in the Molotov cocktail attack were newly arrived immigrants, two Syrians and a Palestinian.

The fear of being accused of intolerance has paralyzed Sweden’s leaders from properly addressing deep-seated intolerance.

Think about it – three quarters of anti-Semitic incidents perpetrated by either Muslim or left-wing extremists, only 5 per cent by right-wing extremists. Seven decades after the Second World War, Europe imported itself new fascism. Islamism and the far left, the new green-red axis, share many of the same enemies, including the Jews – but also America, capitalism, liberal democracy. As the old saying goes, fascism always descends on the United States, but it keeps landing in Europe.

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